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Admissions

Admissions

Applications to any long-term care home in Ontario, including the Glebe Centre, must be coordinated through a Local Health Integrated Network (LHIN).

When the time comes to consider long-term care, contacting the local LHIN is your first step. The LHIN will assist you with your application to a long-term care home and can also provide you with information about alternatives to long-term care. Such alternatives could include supportive/assistive housing, in-home support services, retirement homes and senior’s apartments. LHIN can also provide information on out of province transfers / admissions.

LHIN will give you information on long-term care homes in your area, financial assistance that may be available to you and advice on how to choose a home. If you are eligible for LHIN services, you will be assigned a Care Coordinator who will help determine your needs. If it is determined that you are eligible for long-term care, your Care Coordinator will guide you through the application process.

To contact the Champlain LHIN, call (613) 745-5525 or visit their website: http://healthcareathome.ca/

Tours

Tours of the Glebe Centre are offered weekly. Please contact our Receptionist (613) 238-2727 ext. 301 to receive information on tour days and times. Reservations for tours are required, as space is limited.

Download a copy of the Glebe Centre’s Tour Package.

Accommodation Fees

The cost of accommodation in a long-term care home includes the Resident’s portion and the government’s portion. The Resident pays accommodation charges and the provincial government covers the cost of nursing care and other services. The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care sets basic accommodation and maximum preferred accommodation rates. The amount paid by Residents for their accommodation is called a “co-payment”.

If a Resident cannot afford the basic accommodation rate, the Resident or a representative may apply for a rate reduction through the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.

Resident Accommodation Fees
(Effective July 1, 2019)

Type of Accommodation Co-Payment Daily Amount Co-Payment Monthly Amount
Long-stay Program
Basic or standard
accommodation
Ward room $62.18 $1,891.31
Preferred accommodation Semi-private room $74.96 $2,280.04
Preferred accommodation Private room $88.82 $2,701.61
Short-stay Program
*Not offered at
The Glebe Centre
N/A N/A N/A

Chinese Unit

Recognizing the need for culturally appropriate care for Chinese seniors in the Ottawa area, the local Chinese community and the Glebe Centre joined together to bring to life a unique 32-bed unit when the facility’s new building opened in 2004. Woodlawn, the residence’s 6th floor Resident Care Area was designated as a cultural specific unit for members of the Chinese community. Many of the staff and volunteers working on this unit speak Mandarin or Cantonese. The Glebe Centre also employs a chef who cooks traditional Chinese lunchtime meals and who visits the unit each Wednesday to serve food and mingle with the Residents. Activities on the unit are suited to meet specific cultural preferences.

Having an ethnic-specific unit within a general care facility allows culturally specific programs and services to be focused in one location and increases the opportunity among Chinese speaking seniors to maintain ties with their culture and community while cultivating new friendships.

Ottawa’s Chinese Community was instrumental in bringing this vision to reality and it continues to support the unit through financial donations and as volunteers and advocates.

Culturally Deaf Unit

The Glebe Centre partnered with the Ottawa Deaf Community to established specialty beds on Queenswood, the residence’s 4th floor Resident Care Area to support Deaf and Deaf/ Blind individuals. The establishment of culturally deaf-friendly LTC services in Ottawa to serve eastern Ontario was the result of a dream held by Don Simonds, a longtime volunteer and well respected member of the Ottawa Deaf Community. When a group of Deaf and Deaf/blind Residents are served together, the quality of life is enhanced by the multiplying effect of specialized equipment, volunteers, visitors and staff that can use sign language thus decreasing isolation and potential loneliness. This provides a quality of life that cannot be equaled when one is the sole Deaf person in a facility.

Deaf and Deaf/blind individuals who are suitable for this unit are distinguished by the fact that they use sign language as a primary means of communication on a daily basis.
Sign language interpreters and interveners are used as needed and specialized equipment such as alerting devices and visual fire and smoke alarms have been installed in each designated room.

This unit could not have been created without the ongoing determination, support and advocacy of the Ottawa Deaf Community.

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