News

Abbotsford Needs You!

Man and woman pointing at computer touch screen

Abbotsford Needs You!

By Julie Ireton

If you’re newly retired, love to organize events and ready to shift your skills to volunteer in your own community — Abbotsford at the Glebe Centre could use your help.

With a full slate of both in-person and zoom activities set to launch, the seniors’ centre in the old, stone house across from Lansdowne Park has a lot on offer, but raising the money to keep seniors active, and to keep the centre operating, will be a key focus in the coming year.

Right now, planning is underway for the “Abbotsford House Gala: A Night To Remember”, a 200 person fundraiser at Lansdowne’s Horticultural Building set for October 19. It will feature cocktails, dinner, live entertainment and auctions in support of Abbotsford’s programs.

Volunteers and sponsors are critical for the event to proceed, and the centre’s director of charitable giving, Bruce Hill, is eager to find generous donors and local companies interested in helping out.

Annual bazaar replaced

In the past, folks from far and wide would line up outside the Abbotsford House and crowd into every room to find bargains, baking and treasures inside at the annual bazaar.

But in the wake of COVID, cramming inside small spaces is no longer prudent, so Abbotsford is hosting several, smaller events at different venues to raise some dollars.

Other upcoming fundraising functions include Abbotsford’s Fine Finds: Art, Elegant Treasures and Jewels, to be held Saturday, October 1, from 2 to 5. Tickets are $20 each for this afternoon sale and gathering in support of programs.

And for those who still covet the crafts, baking and teddy bears well-known to former bazaar attendees, Abbotsford’s Craft Fair will take place at the centre on Saturday, November 26 between 10 and 2 complete with a tea room.

Funding struggles

As an organization that operates on government grants, fundraising and membership fees, securing stable funding is always a struggle, according to Karen Anne Blakely, director of community programs at Abbotsford.

“We did lose funding for next year,” said Blakely. “Initially, the City of Ottawa cut all our funds, $91,000 for 2023. We wrote a letter to the mayor and he investigated. The result was they reinstated us to the amount of $44,000.”

But the seniors’ centre is still losing more than half the funding it received from the city in 2022.

Abbotsford’s programs reach a diverse community, including LGBTQ seniors and those who live in subsidized housing and require extra support services, according to Blakely.

“The challenge is making up the money we’ve lost,” she said.

Back stronger with different options

Despite the funding shortfall for 2023, the centre has plans in place for the rest of 2022.

“We are offering more and more in-person classes. We’re also continuing with Zoom, since we’ve found some people like the ease of joining in from home.” said Pat Goyeche, coordinator of community programs at Abbotsford.

New this coming season is a Broadway dance class that will be taught by Mary Tsai, who Pat worked with on numerous theatre productions at the Glebe Neighbourhood Activities Group over the years..

There will be “Get Smart” classes to help seniors figure out the tricks and tips of using an iPhone. And for the first time in two and a half years, the pottery studio will be open for class and studio time.

Speakers series 

“Our speaker series is full blast in the fall,” said Goyeche.

That series will include guest speaker, Geoffrey Stevens who co-authored Flora MacDonald’s own story, Flora! A Woman in a Man’s World, which was published after her death.

There will also be a special travelogue session from Goyeche and her husband, Alex Neve about their trip to Greenland and the Northwest Passage.

New check-in and registration systems

A new, automated check-in system called MySeniorCenter is now greeting everyone who visits Abbotsford. The large, user-friendly touch screen is installed near Reception.

The touch screen will prompt questions concerning COVID protocols and will helps staff manage sign-up and sign-in information as well as take attendance.

A new registration system, which the membership helped fundraise for, now allows participants to register online, but those who prefer to register by phone still have that option.

For more information about the fundraising events or to donate please contact Bruce Hill at: 613-238-2727 ext. 316 or via e-mail at Bhill@glebecentre.ca

Abbotsford is your Seniors Active Living Centre.  We are the community programs of The Glebe Centre Inc., a charitable, not-for-profit, organization which includes a 254 bed long term care home.  Find out more about our services by dropping by 950 Bank Street (the old stone house) Mon-Fri 9-4 pm, telephoning 613-230-5730 or by checking out all of The Glebe Centre facilities and community programs on our website www.glebecentre.ca

Destination Abbotsford for the Great Glebe Garage Sale and Doors Open Ottawa

 

Destination Abbotsford for the Great Glebe Garage Sale and Doors Open Ottawa

By Julie Ireton

After a two year hiatus, due to the pandemic, Abbotsford at the Glebe Centre is once again inviting the public to the old stone farmhouse across from Lansdowne Park for Doors Open Ottawa on Sunday, June 5.

While it will mark 20 years for this popular event in the city, Abbotsford House celebrates 150 years since its construction.

Originally built in 1872, Abbotsford was the private residence for Alexander Mutchmor. In the late 1800s the home stood on a two acre, treed lot with a stable and gardens.

It eventually became a home for elderly residents and was known as the ‘Protestant House of Refuge’.

Today, the heritage house offers numerous activities for seniors including aerobics, language classes, community support services and day-away programs for people with Alzheimer’s and dementia.

These programs benefit from fundraising throughout the year, events that have largely been on hold throughout the pandemic.

This spring, for the first time since 2019, organizers are throwing their energy into the senior centre’s major fundraiser at the Great Glebe Garage Sale on Saturday, May 28.  It will be held both indoors and outdoors rain or shine.

Look for Art, Books, Jewellery, Women’s clothing and lots of Flea Market items.

Deb Hogan started volunteering at Abbotsford last fall and quickly became one of the many members involved in sorting through hundreds of items donated by the community for the garage sale tables.

“Every box we open is unique and kind of a window into the home that it came from,” said Hogan. “I often find myself thinking, what’s the story behind these items?”

A huge variety of treasures come in the door, she says. In the past week she unboxed a dozen champagne glasses and two hand-stitched quilts.

“We treat the donations with great respect. They meant something to somebody at some point,” she said.

About a dozen volunteers have been working in pairs, a couple days a week, to get ready for the sale.

Bev Hellman, who relocated to Ottawa from Saskatchewan to be closer to her daughter and grandchild said the volunteer group has allowed her to meet new friends.

I didn’t know anyone before,” said Hellman.

“We call ourselves the fleas. We’re women who love to go to garage sales, second-hand and antique stores.”

One of the volunteers researches the more rare or valuable donations, and recently discovered they’d acquired a $500 cup and saucer.

While organizers hope the garage sale brings in money to aid Abbotsford programs, they realize that the time they spend together, organizing the wares, has other benefits, especially after two years of isolation.

“It’s so nice to get back with these women, just chatting with them and catching up,” said Hellman.

Abbotsford is your Seniors Active Living Centre for Adults 55+.  It houses the community programs of The Glebe Centre Inc., a charitable, not-for-profit, organization which includes a 254 bed long term care home.  Find out more about our services by dropping by 950 Bank Street (the old stone house) Mon- Fri 9-4 pm, telephoning 613-230-5730 or by checking out all of The Glebe Centre facilities and community programs on our website www.glebecentre.ca

 

Abbotsford House is 150 Years Old!

 

 

Abbotsford House Celebrates 150 years with Doors Open Ottawa on Sunday June 5th.

By Pat Goyeche

Built 150 years ago in 1872, in the gothic revival style, Abbotsford House was named by its builder and first owner, Alexander Mutchmor.   He named it Abbotsford House, after Sir Walter Scott’s home in Scotland.  By 1889 it had been purchased by a group of philanthropic Protestants from the then only other private owner of the house, Mayor Charles H. Mackintosh, who had purchased it in 1879.

The original site of the Protestant Home for the Aged, as it was then called, was on the current grounds of the Canadian Mint.   The vision was to create a home to “assist those who through age, infirmity and misfortune, were unable to help themselves.” Such a facility was much needed at the time, and the sale of Abbotsford to this group was timely.

In August 1889, the Ottawa Journal carried a sketch and accompanying article about Abbotsford House (Protestant Home for the Aged), which gives a sense of how significant a step this was.

Abbotsford House was renovated in 1928 with the addition of a wing to make room for more residents.  It was again renovated in the mid-seventies and converted into a Seniors Recreational Drop-in Centre. It remains a Community Centre for Ottawa seniors who are 55 plus.   Abbotsford is known for its well-rounded and affordable offerings of recreational and social activities as well as community support services to this day.  It is the community-based wing of the Glebe Centre and has been since 1975.

Inside, three original marble fireplace mantels still adorn the parlor and dining room. The ceiling in the front entrance is edged with decorative molded plaster. The house was officially recognized as a Designated Heritage Property in 1984.  The official plaque can be found outside the building under the bay window in the dining room.

In April of 2022 Abbotsford at the Glebe Centre was fortunate to receive the 2021 Glebe Heritage Restoration Award from the Glebe Community Association Heritage Committee for the refurbishment of the front porch and restoration of the bargeboard gables that adorn the ‘old stone house’ across from Lansdowne Park.

The main floor of Abbotsford will be available for viewing.  As part of Doors Open Ottawa, tea will be served at a modest price in the Abbotsford Dining Room throughout the day on Sunday, June 5th.  The community centre’s regular hours are Monday through Friday 8:30 am – 4:30 pm. Members of the public are always welcome to visit and shop in our Boutique, where patrons will find quality second hand women’s clothing, jewelry, books, puzzles, elegant treasurers and art, as well as handmade crafts and teddy bears.  As a charity that is not fully funded we rely on these sales to help maintain our quality programming and services.

Abbotsford is your Seniors Active Living Centre for Adults 55+.  It houses the community programs of The Glebe Centre Inc., a charitable, not-for-profit, organization which includes a 254 bed long term care home.  Find out more about our services by visiting and/or telephoning 613-230-5730 during regular business hours or by checking out all of The Glebe Centre facilities and community programs on our website www.glebecentre.ca

 

 

 

 

What’s Up at Abbotsford

 

By: Pat Goyeche

Abbotsford Seniors Centre continues to offer in-person and Zoom programming and clubs for seniors 55 plus this spring.  The weather is encouraging. Melting ice and snow with the spring thaw brings hope for renewal.  Spring also brings new change and we are all certainly ready for that, with the lifting of some of the measures that have kept us apart physically.

At the time this article was written, Abbotsford continues to monitor and screen all of our patrons. We are committed to keeping you confident that you will be able to enjoy programming and club activities in a safe, relaxed and fun environment.  Keep up with the latest on our public health measures by visiting our website: www.glebecentre.ca under ‘What’s Up at Abbotsford’.

The house is buzzing with busy bee volunteers who are sorting, pricing and storing flea market items, books, art, jewelry and women’s clothing for the Great Glebe Garage sale, to be held on Saturday, May 28th this year.  We owe a great deal to our enthusiastic volunteers who help us raise much-needed dollars for our operations.  We are not fully funded and rely on the donations we are given by the greater community to help operate our not-for-profit centre.  Thank you all for your contributions, which we gladly receive Monday – Friday 8:30 am – 4:30 pm.

Abbotsford House is 150 years old this year!  We are celebrating by sharing our history as part of Doors Open Ottawa on Sunday June 5th.  We will be bringing out archival photographs and sharing stories of days gone by when the house was a mansion that Alexander Mutchmor built in ‘cottage country’ in 1872!  If you have any history or photographs of the house to share, please get in touch with us, we would love to share those memories widely.

To help celebrate our 150th anniversary we will be hosting a Gala on Friday, October 14th in the Horticultural Building.   Save the date, as we promise to have an event to remember as we celebrate our history and our future as a community centre for seniors.

Fitness, dance, yoga, Spanish, French and art classes, as well lectures and clubs such as bridge, ping-pong and mah-jong are all in full swing this spring.  We have more in-person programming now and it is great to hear the laughter and the groans from the multipurpose room, as instructors encourage “one more set of 5 squats”!

We also have a full slate of virtual programming on offer using the Zoom platform.  Many of our members find it an easy way to keep fit and keep in touch without having to leave their homes.  We will continue to offer virtual programming into the future. We clearly heard that request from members in our most recent survey.

We are pleased to announce another initiative. For the first time, we are offering the option of on-line registration, starting in the summer of 2022.  We have been able to purchase a registration system due to the financial support of members and friends of Abbotsford House.  This will streamline registration, boost attendance and help us reach out to more seniors in greater Ottawa.  Staff are excited to use this tool that will help better serve our members and volunteers.

Zoom programming, MailChimp e-mail ‘missives’ and telephone calls have kept us in close contact with our members when it was not possible to open our doors or meet in person.  Keeping in contact has been so important for us all in these challenging times.  Many thanks to our members and volunteers who have supported one another over the past two years.

Hope springs eternal. We are pleased to offer more, see more of you and serve you better with our programming and our new registration system.  Abbotsford is 150 years young and growing.  Grow with us and join in our programming, fundraising and volunteering. We are always enthused to welcome new members and volunteers.

Day Away Programming at Abbotsford House

 

By Julie Ireton

 For Ian Calvert, whose wife Caroline has dementia, the Alzheimer’s-Dementia Day Away Program at Abbotsford House at the Glebe Centre, gives him the respite he needs every week.

“I can feel pretty alone as a caregiver, but I don’t feel alone, because people at Abbotsford are on my team,” said Calvert.

For the past three and a half years, his wife has been attending the day away program. Prior to COVID-19, she would attend one full day a week.

“For brain health we have to be physically and socially active. The variety of activities is great. The staff is terrific. They’re very caring, and they’re fun,” he said.

Due to pandemic restrictions, the program went online for months, but returned to half days in late 2021. There are plans to go back to full-days once it’s safe to do so.

While the activities and exercises keep Caroline engaged and active, he says it’s also a chance for him to take a walk or do errands on his own.

“It’s a break for me,” said Calvert who’s her primary caregiver.

The program is important for the clients with dementia, but it also means a lot to all the caregivers, notes Shirley Lee, Program Facilitator at Abbotsford.

They concentrate on three types of activities: physical, mental and social.

“We try to incorporate an exercise class. It could be a game where they have to lift, bend, sit and stand quite often. We do a lot of quizzes and reminiscing. And the  social component is connecting with others,” said Lee,

Before the pandemic, the program ran four days a week with 12 clients a day.

With the assistance of three or four volunteers, clients are able to gather in smaller groups based on interests and functionality. Games and activities are adapted and geared towards a person’s cognitive level.

“So they can succeed in whatever programming we’re trying to do,” said Lee.

The program adapted quickly as the pandemic took hold in 2020, introducing “senior centre without walls”, a teleconference program in which clients could dial in and participate in trivia or music challenges.

Since the program has a waitlist, the virtual program allowed potential clients who weren’t in the regular day program to start participating in the zoom activities.

“People were isolated. They didn’t have support services. So we opened up the zoom activities to anyone on the waitlist. It allowed us to get to know them,” said Lee.

“When we reopened and they arrived in person, we were familiar faces and voices.”

Given the isolation during the COVID lockdowns, especially in the winter, caregivers have been anxious for the schedule to go back to normal.

“My wife was always reserved, but now she’s more so. She has less confidence and doesn’t take initiative. But at Abbotsford, she really responds and she’s engaged. She’s clearly enjoying it,” said Calvert.

Clients for the Alzheimer’s-Dementia Day Away Program need a referral from Ontario Health and there continues to be a waiting list. The cost is $20 for a half day and $35 for a full day. Round trip transportation is also available for $12, for those in the Abbotsford catchment area.

Abbotsford is your community support centre for adults 55+. We are the community programs of The Glebe Centre Inc., a charitable, not-for-profit, organization which includes a 254-bed long-term care home. Find out more about our services by telephoning us: Mon.-Fri .9 a.m.– 4 p.m. at 613-230-5730 or by checking out all of The Glebe Centre facilities and Abbotsford Community Programs on our website www.glebecentre.ca .

 

 

Abbotsford In-Person Activities are Delayed not Cancelled

 

By: Pat Goyeche

Abbotsford House (Seniors Active Living Community Centre, the old stone house across from Lansdowne Park) remains open during this current wave of COVID, but things are not as they were in December.

Many of our in-person activities have been postponed until we can open up safely again in person.  At this time, our Day Programing for those enrolled in either Luncheon Club or Day Away has shifted to virtual programming.

Some clubs are in house and the Tuesday foot care appointments continue as usual for those members who show proof of vaccination.

Looking for Donations

We are currently open to and accepting donations of books, elegant treasures, jewelry, women’s clothing, art, and flea market items from the community.  Please drop by with your donated goods. We appreciate your contributions.  As a not for profit that is not fully-funded, we need to fundraise in order to keep our seniors programing and services vital and engaging.  Your contributions are also good for the environment, as we recycle, re-use, and help keep Abbotsford’s Active Living Centre ‘open and inviting’ for seniors in Ottawa; all at the same time!

In-Person and Virtual Programs

We are looking forward to starting up our Aerobics and Line Dancing classes in the spacious Horticultural Building at Lansdowne Park as soon as it feasible to do so.   This setting is ideal, as it is a very large venue with high ceilings and lots of space to keep fit and/or dance away your winter blues.  Keep abreast of any changes to our plans or schedule by accessing our website www.glebecentre.ca under Abbotsford Programs and Services and ‘What’s Up at Abbotsford’ for the most up-to-date information or by calling us at 613-230-5730.

Much of our programing, which includes Art, Fitness, Dance, Memoir, Book Club, Device Training, Yoga and Language classes, is continuing to be offered on line via Zoom.  We have different levels of fitness classes for different levels of ability.  Everyone can find the right level with our highly qualified and friendly older adult instructors.  If you are wondering what level is best for you, please contact us and we will help you find the right fit to keep you fit!  It is never too late to join in.

One of initiatives in these COVID times is the loan of individual tablets to our members so that they can connect virtually.  At this time our Day Programing has moved to virtual programming either over Zoom or Mercuri teleconferencing.  Members are encouraged to contact us and we will help connect you.

All of our programs are open to our members.  Membership costs $50 per person annually, beginning in January and running for the calendar year.  You must be 55 + to

join in!    You can join a class without a membership but you would pay an additional $25 for each class.  Your $50 membership fee gives you access to services, information and camaraderie.  If there is one thing we have learned in this pandemic, it is the importance of community and connection.  Helping to create and maintain community for our membership has been a key to combatting social isolation for many of our members.

Snow Go

 ‘Snow Go’ refers seniors and adults with disabilities to snow removal contractors who have passed a screening test, are properly registered and insured.

The Snow Go Assist program is for people over 60 years old or those with disabilities who are defined as low income. The program will reimburse up to $250 of the cost of their snow removal for the season.

Low income is defined by the city as a single person who lives on $31,500 a year or $39,200 for a household of two or more.  Contact us if this would be helpful.

Abbotsford is your community support centre for Adults 55+.  We are the community programs of The Glebe Centre Inc., a charitable, not-for-profit, organization which includes a 254 bed long-term care home.  Find out more about our services by dropping by 950 Bank Street (the old stone house) Mon- Fri 8:30 am-4:30 pm, telephoning 613-230-5730 or by checking out all of The Glebe Centre facilities and community programs on our website www.glebecentre.ca

 

The Restoration of Abbotsford’s Front Porch is a Symbol of the Restoration of Engagement and Activity for our Seniors.

Bill Robertson, President of Members Council, Sarah Moriarty of Amica the Glebe and Lawrence Grant, Executive Director of the Glebe Centre cutting the ribbon after the restoration of the porch Nov. 19, 2021.

By: Pat Goyeche

What’s old is new again

The official cutting of the ribbon for Abbotsford House’s restored front porch took place on Friday November 19th. The original porch that would have been built just under 150 years ago was quite different that today’s version.  It was originally much longer (from the front door to underneath the front window) and the stairs faced Bank Street.  Over time the porch changed, as did the needs of those who at one time were housed in the building.  Around 1975 the house took on its present incarnation as a Seniors Centre, serving the Ottawa region by offering programming and services that help maintain and support seniors living in community.

The rotted pillars that were recently removed had been taken from a previous porch on the side of the building, most likely at the time of the renovation when the ‘home’ became a Seniors Centre in 1975.  The many photos of the porch over the years show varied pillars, steps, layout and materials.  In 1984 it became a heritage property and its facade was therefore protected by law.

Because of the building’s heritage status, many rules and regulations had to be followed in the redesign and rebuild of the porch. Because of this and our inexperience with such detailed work, an architect was hired to provide much-needed project management. Thus began an almost daily exchange of e-mails between the City, architect, builder and our own team on each and every detail.

Thanks to the generosity of numerous donors — including a will bequest from the late Ann Denis, an anonymous donor and a corporate donation from Amica (The Glebe,) as well as donations from Abbotsford members — the project got underway in June and has finally become a reality.

We are very grateful to everyone who saw the need for the restoration and we are so pleased to see the house looking as ‘loved’ on the outside as it is on the inside.

Abbotsford House with long porch circa 1930

Abbotsford House with sunflowers in front the ‘before’ restoration photo.

Back in person, and still online

In September of this year, we were finally able to open our doors to the public again.  Ping Pong, Mah Jong, Muscle Toning, Aerobics, Yoga, Stained Glass, Conversational French, and our Caregiver Club, to name but a few,  are among the many activities that are back and running strong again indoors!

We are currently selling homemade teddy bears, baby blankets, Christmas ornaments, puzzles, books, ladies’ clothing and jewelry and flea market items.  Stop in and support our volunteers who help keep Abbotsford viable by donating their talents and time to our not-for-profit Seniors Centre.

We have been adding more and more indoor classes and clubs as the fall has progressed. We will offer even more in the New Year, while continuing to offer electronical classes over ZOOM at the request of our large membership.  We will continue to ask those that participate or enter our building to show proof of double vaccination and to follow public health measures, in order to keep our members engaged and safe.

Memberships for 2022 will go on sale starting Wednesday, December 1st in advance of registration for winter classes the following week.  The cost is $50 and lasts for a full calendar year.  Look for a full list of January/February/March classes and clubs under Current Guide on our website www.glebecentre.ca and join in!

Collecting flea market items, books, jewelry, women’s clothing, puzzles and art once again…

We will start accepting these items in the New Year, with the plan to sell both “in house” Monday to Friday and at the Great Glebe Garage Sale in the spring.  Your donations of goods are most appreciated.

Please drop by to collect a paper copy of our guide, become a member or a patron, and admire our newly restored porch. Think of us when you think of seniors in the community. We have been: ‘Building Community Since 1975’!

Abbotsford House is more than a Building

 

By: Julie Ireton

Some seniors who have made Abbotsford House at the Glebe Centre part of their lives, for years, didn’t realize what the senior’s centre across from Lansdowne Park really meant to them until the forced COVID lock-downs and isolation began.

Before the pandemic hit in March of 2020, Judith Hoye took three exercise classes a week at Abbotsford at the Glebe Centre across from Lansdowne Park. Then she’d stay after class for social time, coffee, treats and laughs. “All that ended as COVID took over,” said Hoye.  But just because she couldn’t go to Abbotsford, didn’t mean her interaction with other members needed to end.

Hoye was one of the volunteers who started to make regular phone calls to half a dozen other seniors, keeping them up to date on how the centre and its staff might help them out, such as lending out tablets. She encouraged those isolated from friends and family to get involved in some of the “zoom” programming including online art classes. The phone calls and interactions benefited her too.  “Some of those people have become friends and although I have never met them, we will meet when the world rights itself and we can meet face-to-face,” said Hoye.

With vaccine mandates now in place, she plans to safely get back to some of the centre’s activities being offered.

“Abbotsford is a place where people meet and laugh,” said Hoye. “It provides a place where interesting people gather, do something useful, and keep our minds and our bodies stretched and resilient.”

The fitness classes are one of the reasons Merilyn Neilson is glad to be back at Abbotsford after several months away.   As a member of the functional fitness class, she says it helps with strength, mobility, balance and muscle tone. “I love it,” said Neilson who is also looking forward to the further easing of restrictions, possibly in the new year, so the Abbotsford bridge group can also get back to playing cards. “I think it’s an excellent facility. There should be more ‘Abbotsfords’.  I think it saves a lot of senior people in many ways with the friendships and the exercise.” Even though she’s not a “techie” Neilson said she did adjust to taking zoom art classes using watercolors and acrylics. “I was glad I did, it was better than nothing,” she said.  But being able to go back to the centre this fall has lifted her spirits. “Abbotsford is something we truly appreciate,” said Neilson. “It helps us stay in the community rather than finding other ways of living.”

Abbotsford member, Muriel Scott Smith is another member who recently got back to the centre to join her Mahjong club, an activity she’s been part of for the past 10 years. While Scott Smith didn’t take part in the zoom classes, she was able to access medical drives through Community Support Services.  She’s glad her Mahjong group is now back to meeting in person and is looking forward to the day the coffee and the lunches are back on track.

Pat Goyeche, the coordinator of Community Programming is pleased to see the folks back in the house and hopes that by the new year most of the favourite classes, clubs and social gatherings will be ‘in the house’ and at capacity.

The November and December programming of on-line and in-person classes and clubs are listed on the Glebe Centre website (www.glebecentre.ca) under ‘current program guide’.

Abbotsford is your Seniors Active Living Centre for Adults 55+.  It houses the community programs of The Glebe Centre Inc., a charitable, not-for-profit, organization which includes a 254 bed long term care home.  Find out more about our services by telephoning 613-230-5730 during regular business hours or by checking out all of The Glebe Centre facilities and community programs on our website www.glebecentre.ca

 

 

 

 

Abbotsford Serving Seniors in Community

 

By: Julie Ireton

 After too many months of isolation from friends and family, shutdowns, lockdowns and trying to figure out “zoom”, Ottawa seniors are more than ready to be back socializing at their senior’s centre across from Lansdowne Park.

“They’re ecstatic, some are almost moved to tears to be back and see people again,”

said Kirsten O’Brien, in the community support services department of Abbotsford at the Glebe Centre.

“There’s happiness just to be able to see friends, even at a distance and with masks, there’s a reconnecting and a real sense of community again.”

Visitors to Abbotsford must show that they’ve been double vaccinated and fitness classes have fewer people. Weather permitting, they’ve been able to move some activities outside this fall.

But the doors are open and people are returning.

“They are really enjoying contact and interaction. The Sing ‘N Jam club is singing and playing their hearts out on our patio and the two ping pong tables are getting a good workout on Friday mornings,” said Pat Goyeche, coordinator of community programs.  “We’ve even been able to rent larger spaces off site though a special grant which has allowed us to serve more folks safely.  These ‘pop-up’ fitness classes have been very popular!”

For clients who live alone or don’t have family nearby, Abbotsford and its activities, support groups, fitness classes and clubs can be a lifeline for some seniors, according to O’Brien.

“They are so willing to comply with all the safety measures, because the draw to see each other is so special and important,” she said.

Programs such as transportation to medical appointments didn’t stop throughout the pandemic and when the snow starts to fly, another service will also be available.

Snow Go

For seniors who aren’t looking forward to digging out the snow shovels, some city of Ottawa programs may be able to help.

‘Snow Go’ refers seniors and adults with disabilities to contractors who have passed a screening test, are properly registered and insured.

The Snow Go Assist program is for people over 60 years old or those with disabilities who are defined as low income. The program will reimburse up to $250 on the cost of their snow removal for the season.

Low income is defined by the city as a single person who lives on $31,500 a year or $39,200 for a household of two or more.

“If the person meets eligibility and provides documentation they can qualify,” said O’Brien.

Abbotsford is also continuing to support clients at home with phone and virtual programs, including many fitness classes that continue to be available online through Zoom.

But still, many members yearn for the day when there are even more activities available inside the centre.

“We get asked: when can we loiter again? When can we play bridge again?” said Goyeche.  “Our goal is to expand as it is safe to do so and add more in-person programming.”

Abbotsford is your Seniors Active Living Centre for Adults 55+.  It houses the community programs of The Glebe Centre Inc., a charitable, not-for-profit, organization which includes a 254 bed long term care home.  Find out more about our services by dropping by 950 Bank Street (the old stone house) Mon- Fri 9-4 pm, telephoning 613-230-5730 or by checking out all of The Glebe Centre facilities and community programs on our website www.glebecentre.ca

1 2 3 6